Residents call for greater usage of Sligoville Stadium

first_imgResidents of the Sligoville community are demanding greater usage of the Sligoville Stadium. “It’s only when events are taking place you see things happening. They don’t really service it as how they are supposed to and we are not comfortable with it. It’s a sport facility and we expect more from it. We want it used on a frequent basis, every weekend there should be a sport event here,” said Sashawna Powell. Kenrick Thomas says the community is calling out for some development and the complex is just being wasted. “We would like more things taking place that can benefit us in the community. Just once a year we can benefit (Emancifest in July 31 and August 1), so we need more things,” he commented. Talmar Warren the player/coach of the Sligoville St Catherine Division Two team says it is being used more regularly but a lot more can be done to make the complex a springboard for sports development in the community. “As it is we want people to be able to use this to find a way into the sporting arena, which ever field; football, cricket, basketball, whatever field they can go in and make a life for themselves, family and friends, that is what we want for Sligoville,” he said. Marked improvements When The Gleaner visited the multi-sports complex earlier this week, it showed marked improvements since our last visit some three years ago and the brown and cream painting on the complex suggest GC Foster had a major hand in its revitalisation. The complex consists of a 600-seat basketball and netball court, with lighting and fencing, a 1,200-seat cricket oval, a 1,500-seat football field with a six-lane, 400-metre track circling the football field. The chain-link fence enclosing the stadium, which was almost gone has been replaced. The crystallised plastic seats in the stands, the majority of which were completely destroyed, have been changed to concrete and painted over. The old torn up football nets have been changed, with the field being in good playing condition, however, the running track in not visible. The dilapidated seating at the basketball/netball court has also changed to board seats, but the courts are cracked and stained by black spots, one of the basketball hoops have been rooted out from apparent rot and wear at its foundation, with the surrounding fencing all gone except for the rotting fence posts. Five of the 11 casings for floodlights are broken and obviously needs repair based on some loose wires. – LSlast_img read more

Illegal airstrip found in Rupununi

first_img… fuel drums, abandoned camps, chainsaw unearthedAn illegal airstrip was unearthed about five kilometres West of Santa Fe, Rupununi, Region Nine (Upper Takatu-Upper Essequibo) by members of the Guyana Defence Force on Saturday morning.Chief-of-Staff, Brigadier Patrick West when contacted confirmed the discovery was made by Guyana Defence Force (GDF) ranks that were patrolling the area.He noted that the ranks were conducting a reconnaissance mission on Saturday morning when they stumbled upon the seeming newly constructed airstrip.Brigadier West further stated that it was too soon to determine if the airstrip was in use recently, but noted that the relevant authorities were called in to investigate the incident.One of the dugout trenches in close proximity to the illegal airstripHowever, Public Relations Officer of the GDF, Earl Edghill told Guyana Times that following a closer inspection of the perimeter of the airstrip, several dug out trenches were found. They were covered with black plastic and dried branches.Upon removing the plastic and branches, several items were found concealed in the holes; including a chain saw and fuel drums. In addition, a quarter drum of aviation fuel was also found at the airstrip.Edghill also stated that at least 12 abandoned camps were found in close proximity of the airstrip. These camps, he noted, could be those used by farmers over a period of time.When asked if persons in the farming area indicated to the ranks about hearing the sounds of airplanes landing and taking off, he noted that residents are being questioned and an update will be provided shortly.The chainsaw and fuel drum that were found at the airstripIn September 2016, a Joint Service patrol discovered an illegal aircraft hidden just off of the Yupukari Airstrip, Rupununi with United States registration N-767-Z.Subsequently, a team of investigators from the GDF, Guyana Police Force (GPF), Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit (CANU) and Guyana Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) was deployed from Georgetown to the area to conduct investigations and were able to determine that the registration number was fake.Moreover, investigators had discovered during interviews with nearby residents that the aircraft was sighted circling the area on numerous occasions in the past.Additionally, a number of residents shared information they deemed as “suspicious activity”, including the presence of motorcycles or ATVs frequenting the area at midnight.It was reported that a leak was discovered in the fuel tank. This, investigators believe, may have caused the aircraft to land in Guyana.However, it has been reported that one of the local law enforcement agencies was aware of the aircraft at least three weeks before the disclosure was made. It was reported that the security officials were monitoring the aircraft to see if anyone would return to salvage it.Meanwhile, President David Granger has established a one-man Commission of Inquiry (CoI) to probe the discovery of the illegal aircraft and appointed retired Brigadier Edward Collins to investigate, examine, advice and report on all aspects under which the foreign aircraft had entered the country.During the CoI, public meetings were held in several villages including Katoka, Kaicumbay, Yupukari and other villages. The CoI proved that the aircraft entered Guyana illegally.The illegal twin-engine Cessna aircraft was subsequently flown from Yupukari to Lethem initially, before it was flown to the Cheddi Jagan International Airport where it remains to date. (Bhisham Mohamed)last_img read more