Barbados Pride pile up runs against Scorpions

first_imgBRIDGETOWN, Barbados (CMC):Barbados Pride, sent in by Jamaica Scorpions, were 262 for two at the close on the opening day of their first-round match in the Regional First-Class Championship at Kensington Oval here yesterday.Scores: PRIDE 262 for two (Kraigg Brathwaite 111 not out, Shamarh Brooks 49 not out, Shai Hope 77; John Campbell 1-36).AT WARNER PARK: Trinidad and Tobago Red Force, sent in by Leeward Islands Hurricanes, were 155 for three at the close on an abbreviated opening day.Scores: RED FORCE 155 for three (Evin Lewis 66, Narsingh Deonarine 43 not out, Yannick Cariah 28 not out; Gavin Tonge 2-38).AT GUYANA NATIONAL STADIUM: Guyana Jaguars, opting to bat first against Windward Islands Volcanoes, reached 287 for four at the close.Scores: JAGUARS 287 for four (Rajindra Chandrika 140 not out, Vishaul Singh 48, Shiv Chanderpaul 34, Leon Johnson 29; Shane Shillingford 3-87).last_img read more

Bats can navigate using polarized light

first_imgForget the phrase “blind as a bat.” New experiments suggest that members of one species of these furry flyers—Myotis myotis, the greater mouse-eared bat—can do something no other mammal is known to do: They detect and use polarized light to calibrate their long-distance navigation. Previous research hinted that these bats reset their magnetic compass each night based on cues visible at sunset, but the particular cue or cues hadn’t been identified. In the new study, researchers placed bats in boxes in which the polarization of light could be controlled and shifted. After letting the bats experience sundown at a site near their typical roost, the team waited until after midnight (when polarized light was no longer visible in the sky), transported the animals to two sites between 20 and 25 kilometers from the roost, strapped radio tracking devices to them, and then released them. In general, bats whose polarization wasn’t shifted took off for home in the proper direction. But those that had seen polarization shifted 90° at sunset headed off in directions that, on average, pointed 90° away from the true bearing of home, the researchers report online today in Nature Communications. It’s not clear how the bats discern the polarized light, but it may be related to the type or alignment of light-detecting pigments in their retinas, the team suggests. The bats may have evolved to reset their navigation system using polarized light because that cue persists long after sunset and is available even when skies are cloudy. Besides these bats (and it’s not known whether other species of bat can do this, too), researchers have found that certain insects, birds, reptiles, and amphibians can navigate using polarized light.last_img read more