Corby beach house sold as family counts down to Schapelle’s return

first_imgSchapelle Corby pictured in Denpasar, Bali. Picture: Lukman S. BintoroA BEACH house belonging to infamous Gold Coast resident Schapelle Corby’s family has gone under contract.11 Foch Street Tugun Qld 4224The three bedroom property at 11 Foch Street, Tugun, just over half an hour from the Gold Coast, was registered to Ms Corby’s father Michael who died almost a decade ago.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this homeless than 1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor6 hours ago11 Foch Street Tugun Qld 4224An offer was made on the two bathroom, single garage property before it could be opened for inspection mid-month.11 Foch Street Tugun Qld 4224The Corbys were looking at offers over $549,000 for the property via Sandi Webber of Armstrong Real Estate on the Gold Coast. Ms Corby’s mother Rosleigh Rose was registered owner of the property in November 2008, paying $375,000. She then sold it to Ms Corby’s sister Mercedes for $360,000.11 Foch Street Tugun Qld 4224The property was listed in Michael Corby’s name on current records, and if it sells for $549,000 it will be $174,000 more than Rosleigh Rose had paid nine years ago.Schapelle Corby is due to return to Australia within the next two months.11 Foch Street Tugun Qld 4224Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:29Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:29 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenChris Hemsworth’s Byron Bay mega-mansion00:29 Related videos 00:29Chris Hemsworth’s Byron Bay mega-mansion00:33Salim Mehajer: From glamour to jail00:35Gina Rinehart’s property portfolio00:38Socceroos star sells Lower Plenty dream home00:40Celebrity homes in Noosa00:31Historic home for salelast_img read more

Dangerous new strain of cannabis wrecks lives of South African teens

first_imgMailOnline 22 April 2015The potent strain of cannabis is grown in Swaziland, one of South Africa’s poorest states, and is often mixed with heroin to produce a highly addictive drug known as nyope.It’s the most widely used illegal drug in the world, but does cannabis deserve its reputation as being one of the safest?Not if you take a look at South Africa, one of the UK’s biggest providers of high-strength cannabis, where a potent strain of the plant dubbed ‘swazi gold’ is wrecking havoc on its young population.As revealed in BBC’s Stacey Dooley Investigates, which aired last night, poverty-stricken grandmothers are growing it, drug mules are risking their lives to smuggle it out of the country, and what stays behind is ruining the lives of South Africa’s drug-addled teens.Swazi gold is grown in the tiny South African sovereign state of Swaziland, where the climate and nutrient-rich soil is perfect for growing marijuana.Farmers – many of them ‘Grannies’ whose children have died and who are now in charge of providing for their grandchildren –  have developed the potent strain through cross-pollination, and can now yield double the crop they once could annually.The result is cannabis which boasts a staggeringly high concentration of THC, the psychoactive agent which produces the high, which finds its way either to the streets of the UK, or the streets of Johannesburg and beyond.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3049069/Thought-cannabis-safe-Meet-South-African-teens-ravaged-dangerous-new-strain-known-swazi-gold-end-streets-Britain.htmllast_img read more